4 Ways Blogging Prepared Me To Write Well In College

Two out of my three majors focus on learning how to write.

All are writing-intensive.

And I think blogging helped prepare me for them.

I won’t say that it was the only thing that helped me, or even the most important thing, but it certainly played a role in getting me ready for college.

I’m serious. As a triple major in English & Creative Writing, Journalism, and Gender, Women’s, & Sexuality Studies, I write a tremendous amount each and every day. Blogging was an essential part of the foundation I laid in high school, the foundation that serves me well now.

Today, I’m looking specifically at how blogging helped me to be a better student of creative writing and journalism.

(For reference, I’m currently a junior in college who has been blogging for seven years, which means that at the time I began college I had blogged for not quite five years.)

I hope you enjoy this post and that it provides some food for thought! Here we go!

My desk. Indiana. January 2015.

1. I got used to writing (nearly) every day

As I said earlier, I write each and every day in college – not only on weekdays but on the weekends as well. I also write just about every day of every school break, no matter how long or short. If I weren’t already used to writing every day I seriously think I would have floundered in college, especially since I was homeschooled and did not have very many structured writing assignments. I had to devise my own writing projects and, over time, this blog morphed into an every-other-day thing. Which meant that I typically wrote every day, in order to not fall behind during busier times in my life.

2. Writing things on very short notice was normal for me

Again, because I was homeschooled and my mom’s idea of writing instruction was fairly free-form, I didn’t have very many deadlines until I started dual-enrollment college classes. Even then, because I never took more than two courses per semester, the workload wasn’t strenuous at all compared to what I now handle!

Thanks to blogging, I’m used to very short turn-around times on pieces of writing, whether for my lit, writing, or journalism classes. I know that I can’t spend too much time staring at my screen or a piece of paper. Pretty soon the words start flowing.

My desk. Dublin. June 2017.

3. I became comfortable sharing my writing with others

Why do all these points end up coming back to my education as a homeschooler? But it’s true: Even with the dual-enrollment classes I took, I wouldn’t have had nearly as much experience sharing my writing were it not for blogging.

I’m not comfortable with sharing ALL forms of my writing – poetry, for instance, is still a sensitive spot for me – but overall it doesn’t faze me the way it did before I started blogging.

4. I practiced interpreting writing prompts

I mean, assignments in college are obviously much more stringent than, say, Top Ten Tuesday prompts, but the basic idea is still the same and relates back to item #2 on this list: You have to be able to read the prompt, briefly brainstorm, and then get right to work. Even if I’m not a huge fan of a writing prompt I get in class, I easily fall into the habit I developed when writing for this blog.

-~-

Do you agree? Has blogging helped you during your time at college? If so, how?

About nevillegirl

Elizabeth. University of Iowa class of 2019. Triple majoring in English & Creative Writing, Journalism, and Gender, Women's, & Sexuality Studies. Twenty-one-year-old daydreamer, introvert, voracious reader, aspiring writer, and lesbian. Passionate about feminism, mental health, comic books, and cats.
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